Kevin Rushby

Author, Journalist & Traveller

Hunting Pirate Heaven

Format:
Imprint:
ISBN:
Category:
Purchase:
Paperback
Robinson
1 84119 488 3
Travel
Amazon.co.uk

A chance meeting on the muddy foreshore of the River Thames starts Kevin Rushby on a voyage in search of the lost pirate settlements that once existed on the islands and atolls of the Indian Ocean. Hitching rides on a motley assortment of freighters, dhows, yachts and fishing smacks, he sails up the African coast, then east to the islands of the Comoros and Madagascar. The final objective was to locate the descendants of the sixteenth-century pirates who had carved kingdoms for themselves in the remote jungles of north-east Madagascar.

Along his way, Rushby meets the crackpot dreamers, the tough settlers, the fighters and the failures who live on the coasts and islands now. It is a story full of adventure and incident: voyages to islands where forgotten Portuguese forts lie covered in jungle, places where some have tried to shoot their way to paradise, and where the ever-present ocean can destroy lives and dreams as quickly as men and women create them.

Hunting Pirate Heaven: Reviews

'Frequently hilarious and always entertaining, Hunting Pirate Heaven is a nautical Don Quixote, a seredipitous voyage teeming with the joy of travel and brimming with literary elan.'
Justin Marozzi, Literary Review

'...this is an enjoyable book, not least because it includes the recipe for true salmagundi... Pukka, as no pirate ever said.'
Giles Foden, The Guardian

'I've been a dedicated follower of Kevin Rushby's travelogues ever since I read his Eating the Flowers of Paradise which dealt with the acquired taste of qat. 'Heaven, his most fascinating book yet, once again shows his aptitiude for serendipity. 'You get on the wrong bus,' he observes, 'And realize it's the right one after all.'
Spencer Rumsey, New York's Newsday

'Kevin Rushby's wonderfully detailed book is a personal journey of discovery, a travelogue filled with odd characters and odd modes of transport.
Roger Moore, The Chicago Tribune